meurves:

lupita-nyongo:

Lupita Nyong’o’s Speech at the ESSENCE Black Women In Hollywood Luncheon

I wrote down this speech that I had no time to practice so this will be the practicing session. Thank you Alfre, for such an amazing, amazing introduction and celebration of my work. And thank you very much for inviting me to be a part of such an extraordinary community. I am surrounded by people who have inspired me, women in particular whose presence on screen made me feel a little more seen and heard and understood. That it is ESSENCE that holds this event celebrating our professional gains of the year is significant, a beauty magazine that recognizes the beauty that we not just possess but also produce.

I want to take this opportunity to talk about beauty, black beauty, dark beauty. I received a letter from a girl and I’d like to share just a small part of it with you: “Dear Lupita,” it reads, “I think you’re really lucky to be this black but yet this successful in Hollywood overnight. I was just about to buy Dencia’s Whitenicious cream to lighten my skin when you appeared on the world map and saved me.”

My heart bled a little when I read those words, I could never have guessed that my first job out of school would be so powerful in and of itself and that it would propel me to be such an image of hope in the same way that the women of The Color Purple were to me. 

I remember a time when I too felt unbeautiful. I put on the TV and only saw pale skin, I got teased and taunted about my night-shaded skin. And my one prayer to God, the miracle worker, was that I would wake up lighter-skinned. The morning would come and I would be so excited about seeing my new skin that I would refuse to look down at myself until I was in front of a mirror because I wanted to see my fair face first. And every day I experienced the same disappointment of being just as dark as I was the day before. I tried to negotiate with God, I told him I would stop stealing sugar cubes at night if he gave me what I wanted, I would listen to my mother’s every word and never lose my school sweater again if he just made me a little lighter. But I guess God was unimpressed with my bargaining chips because He never listened. 

And when I was a teenager my self-hate grew worse, as you can imagine happens with adolescence. My mother reminded me often that she thought that I was beautiful but that was no conservation, she’s my mother, of course she’s supposed to think I am beautiful. And then … Alek Wek. A celebrated model, she was dark as night, she was on all of the runways and in every magazine and everyone was talking about how beautiful she was. Even Oprah called her beautiful and that made it a fact. I couldn’t believe that people were embracing a woman who looked so much like me, as beautiful. My complexion had always been an obstacle to overcome and all of a sudden Oprah was telling me it wasn’t. It was perplexing and I wanted to reject it because I had begun to enjoy the seduction of inadequacy. But a flower couldn’t help but bloom inside of me, when I saw Alek I inadvertently saw a reflection of myself that I could not deny. Now, I had a spring in my step because I felt more seen, more appreciated by the far away gatekeepers of beauty. But around me, the preference for my skin prevailed, to the courters that I thought mattered I was still unbeautiful. And my mother again would say to me you can’t eat beauty, it doesn’t feed you and these words plagued and bothered me; I didn’t really understand them until finally I realized that beauty was not a thing that I could acquire or consume, it was something that I just had to be. 

And what my mother meant when she said you can’t eat beauty was that you can’t rely on how you look to sustain you. What is fundamentally beautiful is compassion for yourself and for those around you. That kind of beauty enflames the heart and enchants the soul. It is what got Patsey in so much trouble with her master, but it is also what has kept her story alive to this day. We remember the beauty of her spirit even after the beauty of her body has faded away. 

And so I hope that my presence on your screens and in the magazines may lead you, young girl, on a similar journey. That you will feel the validation of your external beauty but also get to the deeper business of being beautiful inside. 

There is no shade to that beauty.

Perf speech!!

brownglucose:

alishaisclassy:

superselected:

This Educational Video is the Only Parody of Nicki Minaj’s “Anaconda” You Should Watch.

MORE.

OMG WATCH THE VIDEO!
It’s so damn cute and funny!

LMAO

qrieves:

uoa:

tinysquids:

toxicwinner:

me

I fucking quit

i hate art

"where’s your homework"



The only expansion is that the studio goers are unwittingly performing and creating the art by being there. Otherwise I can’t!

qrieves:

uoa:

tinysquids:

toxicwinner:

me

I fucking quit

i hate art

"where’s your homework"

The only expansion is that the studio goers are unwittingly performing and creating the art by being there. Otherwise I can’t!

afrikanattire:

Toubou mother, Niger
The way she’s holding that basket :>

afrikanattire:

Toubou mother, Niger

The way she’s holding that basket :>

accradotalt:

Strolling Goats as a photo project is introducing Accra to the world in a different style. we are telling a stories of awesome fashion, food and people on the streets of Accra. Strolling Goats have been to James Town, Adabraka and Nima so far, and it will continue to show more beautiful places in the city. Get to know more about Strolling Goats accradotalttours.wordpress.com

cre8tivesilence:

Flying Lotus - Never Catch Me (feat. Kendrick Lamar)

securelyinsecure:

Happy Birthday, Jessica Williams!

Jessica joined The Daily Show with Jon Stewart in 2012 at the tender age of 22, making her the show’s youngest cast member ever as well as its first black female correspondent.

“It’s impossible to be perfect, and you won’t do a good job if you’re too focused on proving yourself to others. Instead, I try to envision myself succeeding in whatever I’m doing.”

ashikinshan:

Uncle Patrick Chinery and his family at their Adedeinkpo, Accra home. at Ambassador Hotel when it was decorated for Ghana’s Independence Celebrations in 1957. Photo was taken by Mr. James Barnor, renowned photographer and former owner of Ever Young Photo Studio, Jamestown, Accra, Ghana.]

ashikinshan:

Uncle Patrick Chinery and his family at their Adedeinkpo, Accra home. at Ambassador Hotel when it was decorated for Ghana’s Independence Celebrations in 1957. Photo was taken by Mr. James Barnor, renowned photographer and former owner of Ever Young Photo Studio, Jamestown, Accra, Ghana.]

whatisthat-velvet:

securelyinsecure:

Yvette Nicole Brown Responds to the NY Times’s portrayal of Shonda Rhimes as an “Angry Black Woman”

I didn’t even see Yvette’s tweets..But yeah. This happened and Black twitter went in.

dynastylnoire:

horcha-ta:

crystal-celeste:

When I was a student, all that was told to me was how much my cultura didn’t matter. How important European art and standards are, and how totally dominant their aesthetic should be. All I wanted to do was tell my story. And I looked nothing like what is considered relevant or beautiful or important by society’s ideals. But I JUST.KEPT.GOING. Here are some of my pieces. I’m here to uplift and change who is in the spotlight. Powerful womyn of color. My indigenous sisters.

Love her!

YESSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS

chescaleigh:

Sesame Street: Janelle Monae- Power of Yet

I just….love her.

the-goddamazon:

BASICALLY.
And if you try and justify a Black person’s murder based on how they dressed, talked, looked, or their economic status you are trash and I hope you die in a car accident.

the-goddamazon:

BASICALLY.

And if you try and justify a Black person’s murder based on how they dressed, talked, looked, or their economic status you are trash and I hope you die in a car accident.

12yearsaking:

Look at him appreciate cultures without wearing them as a costume. It’s that easy.

shatteredchrystal:

runaon:

a-little-bi-furious:

asherehsa:

samjoonyuh:

Perspective. 

"Looting? I thought these were supposed to be nonviolent protests"

I know it’s incredible! People are literally coming out of the woodwork to comment on this photoset to focus on the looting headline with “well yes it is nice they were helping people hit with the tear gas, but stealing is still wrong uwu” as if they’re back to kindergarten morality.

Like everyone who’s gone to boot camp I’ve been tear gassed. They put about 50+ of you in a gas chamber and toss it in. You have to stay there until your rank is allowed to exit. Before that though, you have to say your name, rank, and social security number. You then exit and file into ranks (again) outside and are not allowed at any point to rinse your face or eyes for the entire day.

That right there? Easily the worst part of boot camp. My eyes were literally swollen shut. I was blinded for a good 30 minutes and my chest hurt for days.

I have zero problem and not and ounce of judgement for people raiding a mcdonalds that can easily afford to repair damage for ANYTHING to help ease the shittiness that is being tear gassed. Esp because every one of us in boot were medically sound to deal with tear gas. Children, asthmatics, people prone to panic and anxiety attacks, the elderly as sooo many more are NOT going to handle tear gas well at ALL.

Or that smoke the police use either.

It’s easy to sit there and judge someone from the safety of your home and say things like “it’s just tear gas” or “it can’t be that bad”.

Fuck you. As someone who HAS been gassed, you need to stfu.

I remember all the preparation they did to get us ready for the gas chamber in boot camp. We were taught how to handle ourselves, how to control our breathing, not to touch anything, how to avoid the worst of the gas. But it still didn’t matter. I remember taking in that first breath and feeling like I had just been kicked in the chest. I remember a few guys in my platoon falling down and vomiting. We knew the gas wasn’t as bad on the floor but we were the fifth platoon through and the vomit kept us from bending over more than absolutely necessary. I remember a few guys, guys in peak health training to be infantrymen, breaking ranks and running for the door only to be dragged back in kicking and screaming until they said name, rank and serial. They were expecting it, trained for it, bragging about how it wouldn’t bother them.
I remember standing there with all of the mucus from my nasal cavity on the front of my ACUs and thinking to myself “This is the nonviolent option?”
Covered head to toe and my skin still itching I looked down at the silver wedding band hanging next to my dog tags and realized that the gas had eaten little pits into its surface.
I stood there and thought of all the news reports I had seen over the years. The uprisings and revolutionaries being gassed, the crowds running from men in masks.
That’s the moment I got it, staring at my ruined wedding band, that’s the moment I realized terrorism isn’t about bombs or who is using them. It’s about controlling people through fear. It’s about removing their ability to act reasonably, to make them seem like the monsters. Terrorism is about triggering people to fight or flight then blaming them for not being rational. It’s about power. Remove someone’s power to act with reason, and you remove their humanity.